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REAL tomatoes

June 5, 2012

The growing season is upon us and soon the rest of us will be enjoying the wonderful full flavor of vine ripened tomatoes. But for those people who are lucky to eat tomatoes grown at Mock’s Greenhouse in Morgan County, tomatoes are a year-round pleasure.

Starting with three greenhouses in 2005, Paul Mock’s hydroponic production has expanded to 14 structures. He grows heirloom tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, basil, cucumbers, watercress, cilantro, arugula, and radishes. Ginger is grown organically.

Mock’s provides produce to area restaurants but almost all their crop  is trucked weekly to the Washington, DC-Baltimore area where farmers markets as well as shoppers at major grocery chains, such as Whole Foods, enjoy the flavors. 

Grown hydroponically, with recirculated water high in nutrients, the aroma inside the greenhouses is rich with organic matter.  I had always thought that hydroponic tomatoes were flavorless, but visiting Mock’s taught me otherwise!

The plants have thick roots and are supported with a pulley system from the rafters.

And the view isn’t bad either!

Paul and Raynette Mock
http://mocksgreenhouseandfarm.com/
670 Tanglewood Lane
Berkeley Springs, WV 25411
Morgan County
304-258-5608


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9 Comments leave one →
  1. June 5, 2012 9:41 am

    I miss real tomatoes 😦 😦

  2. June 5, 2012 7:49 pm

    We have a tomato here that is the only one native to Florida. It was discovered a decade or so ago in the everglades. Each tomato is about the size of a marble. The taste though is like you just bit into 25 of the best tasting tomato’s you’ve ever eaten all at once! Talk about an explosion of taste from a tiny tomato! If you wanted a few seeds I believe I have some left from planting that you could have. JW

    • June 5, 2012 8:21 pm

      wow!!! THANKS!!! I have posted to the farmers who are part of the WVFarm2u Collaborative to ask who might be interested. I can name 4 or 5 but we’d also have to figure the best growing conditions, given the relative difference in the ecosystems. Having just aired the Hatfield and McCoy series on tv, we don’t want to start another squabble. LOL

      • June 5, 2012 8:56 pm

        No tomato is worth gettin’ shot over!… unless she’s your wife! LOL
        I have to see how many seeds I have left. If worst comes to worst I’d have to wait until the fruit appears, the send you seeds from them. Since they are not hybrids, each seed takes after the seed before them. When the tomato was first discovered and verified, the seeds went for $1 a seed! I bought ten and had 10 plants sprout. I should have saved more seeds from last year but did not think much about giving them away. Next season I’ll put aside up to a thousand just to make sure I have enough for everyone now. What part of WV are you in? I just spent 2 years volunteering my time up there building a 10,000 sq ft old style post and beam barn for an animal sanctuary near Athens. (barns are a hobby of mine). I’ll let you know in a couple days about the seeds 🙂

      • June 6, 2012 6:13 am

        I live in Huntington, on the Ohio River at the Kentucky line. One wonderful aspect of this assignment to blog about farms in West Virginia is that I am getting to travel all over the state. I moved here 5 years ago when I married a professor who teaches forensic science at Marshall University, so highways were about it until now. I’ve been down I-77 so know, generally, the countryside around Athens, but have not been off the highway in that section yet. It looks like a beautiful mountainous area and I will have to check out the animal sanctuary! Meanwhile, back on the tomato front, I will be contacting a woman who apparently is an expert at nurturing tomatoes. As one farmer put it last night in facebook discussion, we give a couple of seeds to Barbara and we will all have seeds the next year. So I will be talking to her to see if she can do justice to your offer!

      • June 6, 2012 6:47 am

        sounds good! I’ll see if I can get more info about the everglades tomato.

      • June 6, 2012 6:55 am

        That didn’t take long…just a google away. It seems since their discovery it didn’t take very long for them to hit the market.Here is a ling selling them now; http://www.localharvest.org/native-florida-wild-everglades-tomato-seeds-C19069

      • June 6, 2012 3:23 pm

        super!!!

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